3D Animation and Visualization

snow_crystals_falling_down dmd-2

  • 3D Animation I (Introduction)
  • Modeling I
  • Lighting & Rendering I (Introduction)
  • Animation II (Advanced)
  • History of Computer Graphics
  • Modeling / Lighting & Rendering II (Advanced)
  • Simulations
  • Character Rigging
  • Composting for Visual Effects

2300. 3D Animation 1 (Introduction)
Three credits. Two 3-hour studio sessions. Prerequisites: DMD1000, DMD1030 and instructor consent.
An introduction to 3D Animation techniques including key framing, curve editing, timing, squash and stretch, walk cycles, and the 12 principles of animation.

2310. Modeling 1
Three Credits. Two 3-hour studio courses. Prerequisites: DMD1000, DMD1030, DMD2300 and instructor consent.
A comprehensive course designed to illuminate the connection between the audience and the image on screen. Students learn how to create polygonal 3D models using industry standard modeling tools.

2320. Lighting & Rendering 1 (Introduction)
Three credits. Two 3-hour studio sessions. Prerequisites: DMD1000, DMD1030, DMD2300 and instructor consent.
Introduction to dramatic lighting, 3 point lighting, texturing, bump maps, displacement maps, ambient occlusion, Final Gathering, raytracing, shadows.

3300. Animation II (Advanced)
Three credits. Two 3-hour studio sessions. Prerequisites: DMD1000, DMD1030, DMD2300 and instructor consent.
This course is the foundation of character animation. Students learn how to apply core animation principles through classic animation exercises. Principles of timing, arcs, silhouette, anticipation and follow through are manipulated to visually convey weight, force, self-impulse and emotion to bring otherwise inanimate objects to life. Best practices are learned using industry standard 3D software to enable students to effectively create appealing animated objects and characters.
Open to Digital Media and Design majors and minors, others by instructor consent.

3305. History of CG
Three credits. Two 3-hour sessions. Prerequisites: DMD1000, DMD1030, DMD2300 and instructor consent.
History of CG is course that teaches the history of computer generated imagery (CGI) from its beginnings to present. Students will learn how CGI started and what problems existed in its infancy. And based upon history, what the trends in computer animation and visual effects are and where they are headed in the future.
Open to Digital Media and Design majors and minors, others by instructor consent.

3310. Modeling, Lighting & Rendering II (Advanced)
Three credits. Two 3-hour sessions. Prerequisites: DMD1000, DMD1030, DMD2300, DMD2310, DMD2320 and instructor consent.
Modeling, Lighting & Rendering 2 is a comprehensive course designed to illuminate the connection between the audience and the image on screen. Students learn how lighting creates mood in a scene and the technical ways in which CG lighting is achieved. Students will learn what types of lights to use, how and when to use them, and techniques to achieve realistic lighting while being resource savvy. Lighting in theater as well as in traditional film will be studied to give students a solid understanding of why certain lighting choices are made and why they work, whether in live action or CG applications
Open to Digital Media and Design majors and minors, others by instructor consent.

3350. Simulations
Three credits. Two 3-hour sessions. Prerequisites: DMD1000, DMD1030, DMD2300 and instructor consent.
Simulation & Technical Directing gives students an intermediate understanding of the art and science of creating physical simulations using particle systems and collision detection. It also teaches the students how to create complicated rendering and compositing setups that make their animations both easier to render, and more flexible within the bounds of any animation or VFX sequence.
Open to Digital Media and Design majors and minors, others by instructor consent.

4310. Character Rigging
Three credits. Two 3-hour sessions. Prerequisites: DMD1000, DMD1030, DMD2300 and instructor consent.
Character Rigging will teach rigging concepts to students with a specific emphasis on animated props and characters. Also covered in the course are techniques for using and creating bones, constraints, skeletons, skinning, and weight painting. Upon completion of the course, students will understand the connection between animation and rigging, and specifically, how rigging increases quality and productivity in animation production.
Open to Digital Media and Design majors and minors, others by instructor consent.

4340. Compositing For Visual Effects
Three credits. Two 3-hour sessions. Prerequisites: DMD1000, DMD1030, DMD2300 and instructor consent.
Compositing for Visual Effects takes the students further into the art of visual effects.
Working with Film Students, they go out and shoot plates on HD that fulfill the desire and needs of someone else (the film student). They then must work with their “client” to achieve the desired effect on time, and on-budget. The students will hone their effects skills, as they learn to track the motion of on-set cameras, objects and elements. They will learn that the best way to do an effect isn’t always to pick up a computer mouse, but might be to go out and shoot elements to be manipulated in 2D after the fact.
Open to Digital Media and Design majors and minors, others by instructor consent.